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City Officials To Meet Monday on School Safety

After Friday's school shooting in Newtown, CT, Woburn's officials will meet to discuss safety measures in public buildings.

 

As communities across the country grapple with , Woburn's public officials are using the event as a catalyst to confirm and review safety plans for city buildings.

"This event is especially troubling to those of us who have responsibility for keeping children safe," said Mayor Scott Galvin and Superintendent of Schools Mark Donovan in a joint statement issued on Saturday. "Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone who has been touched by this tragedy."

According to the statement, all of the city's public schools have security measures and plans in place. Officials will meet today "to review the various staff training initiatives and other matters concerning security in our schools in light of the tragedy in Connecticut."

Both Mayor Galvin and Supt. Donovan emphasized that "we believe the proper procedures are in place to keep our students as safe as possible."

"We will communicate with all staff members of the Woburn Public Schools to ensure the level of vigilance that exists in our schools remains high," continued the statement. "We will also provide staff members with additional resources and information on how to respond appropriately when students return on Monday morning."

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The complete statement is below:

A Joint Statement from Mayor Scott Galvin and Superintendent of Schools Mark Donovan regarding the tragic events in Connecticut:

We share the feelings of shock and sadness being felt around the country upon hearing the news of the horrific incident at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. This event is especially troubling to those of us who have responsibility for keeping children safe. Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone who has been touched by this tragedy.

We are fortunate in Woburn to have a very strong relationship among the Mayor’s office, School Department, Police Department, Fire Department and other leading city officials. The School Department, Police Department and Fire Department have always worked together, along with support from the Mayor’s Office and School Committee, to ensure our public schools are safe. Security systems are securely in place in all schools, and there are specific procedures for allowing people to enter our buildings.

Since the tragedy happened, there’s ongoing dialogue among Mayor Galvin, School Committee Chairman Michael Mulrenan, Police Chief Robert Ferullo, and Superintendent of Schools Mark Donovan. We have scheduled a meeting for Monday, Dec. 17, to review the various staff training initiatives and other matters concerning security in our schools in light of the tragedy in Connecticut.

We will communicate with all staff members of the Woburn Public Schools to ensure the level of vigilance that exists in our schools remains high. We will also provide staff members with additional resources and information on how to respond appropriately when students return on Monday morning. In the meantime, we want to assure you that we believe the proper procedures are in place to keep our students as safe as possible.

We understand that children may react in many ways in response to news of this inexplicable and tragic incident. We would like to provide you with the following information for helping children cope with national tragedies. This information was made available by the National Association of School Psychologists.

A National Tragedy: Helping Children Cope
Tips for Parents and Teachers

 
Whenever a national tragedy occurs, such as terrorist attacks or natural disasters, children, like many people, may be confused or frightened. Most likely they will look to adults for information and guidance on how to react.  Parents and school personnel can help children cope first and foremost by establishing a sense of safety and security. As more information becomes available, adults can continue to help children work through their emotions and perhaps even use the process as a learning experience.

All Adults Should:

  1.  Model calm and control.  Children take their emotional cues from the significant adults in their lives. Avoid appearing anxious or frightened.
  2.  Reassure children that they are safe and (if true) so are the other important adults in their lives. Depending on the situation, point out factors that help insure their immediate safety and that of their community.
  3.  Remind them that trustworthy people are in charge.  Explain that the government emergency workers, police, firefighters, doctors, and the military are helping people who are hurt and are working to ensure that no further tragedies occur.
  4.  Let children know that it is okay to feel upset.  Explain that all feelings are okay when a tragedy like this occurs.  Let children talk about their feelings and help put them into perspective.  Even anger is okay, but children may need help and patience from adults to assist them in expressing these feelings appropriately.
  5.  Observe children’s emotional state.  Depending on their age, children may not express their concerns verbally. Changes in behavior, appetite, and sleep patterns can also indicate a child’s level of grief, anxiety or discomfort.  Children will express their emotions differently. There is no right or wrong way to feel or express grief.
  6.  Look for children at greater risk.  Children who have had a past traumatic experience or personal loss, suffer from depression or other mental illness, or with special needs may be at greater risk for severe reactions than others.  Be particularly observant for those who may be at risk of suicide.  Seek the help of mental health professional if you are at all concerned.
  7.  Tell children the truth. Don’t try to pretend the event has not occurred or that it is not serious.  Children are smart.  They will be more worried if they think you are too afraid to tell them what is happening.
  8.  Stick to the facts.  Don’t embellish or speculate about what has happened and what might happen. Don’t dwell on the scale or scope of the tragedy, particularly with young children.
  9.  Keep your explanations developmentally appropriate. Early elementary school children need brief, simple information that should be balanced with reassurances that the daily structures of their lives will not change. Upper elementary and early middle school children will be more vocal in asking questions about whether they truly are safe and what is being done at their school.  They may need assistance separating reality from fantasy. Upper middle school and high school students will have strong and varying opinions about the causes of violence and threats to safety in schools and society.  They will share concrete suggestions about how to make school safer and how to prevent tragedies in society. They will be more committed to doing something to help the victims and affected community.  For all children, encourage them to verbalize their thoughts and feelings. Be a good listener!
  10. Monitor your own stress level.  Don’t ignore your own feelings of anxiety, grief, and anger. Talking to friends, family members, religious leaders, and mental health counselors can help. It is okay to let your children know that you are sad, but that you believe things will get better. You will be better able to support your children if you can express your own emotions in a productive manner. Get appropriate sleep, nutrition, and exercise.

What Parents Can Do:

  1.  Focus on your children over the week following the tragedy.  Tell them you love them and everything will be okay. Try to help them understand what has happened, keeping in mind their developmental level.
  2.  Make time to talk with your children.  Remember if you do not talk to your children about this incident someone else will. Take some time and determine what you wish to say.
  3.  Stay close to your children. Your physical presence will reassure them and give you the opportunity to monitor their reaction. Many children will want actual physical contact.  Give plenty of hugs.  Let them sit close to you, and make sure to take extra time at bedtime to cuddle and to reassure them that they are loved and safe.
  4.  Limit your child’s television viewing of these events.  If they must watch, watch with them for a brief time; then turn the set off.  Don’t sit mesmerized re-watching the same events over and over again.
  5.  Maintain a “normal” routine. To the extent possible stick to your family’s normal routine for dinner, homework, chores, bedtime, etc., but don’t be inflexible.  Children may have a hard time concentrating on schoolwork or falling asleep at night.
  6.  Spend extra time reading or playing quiet games with your children before bed.  These activities are calming, foster a sense of closeness and security, and reinforce a sense of normalcy. Spend more time tucking them in.  Let them sleep with a light on if they ask for it.
  7.  Safeguard your children’s physical health.  Stress can take a physical toll on children as well as adults.  Make sure your children get appropriate sleep, exercise, and nutrition.
  8.  Consider praying or thinking hopeful thoughts for the victims and their families.  It may be a good time to take your children to your place of worship, write a poem, or draw a picture to help your child express their feelings and feel that they are somehow supporting the victims and their families.
  9.  Find out what resources your school has in place to help children cope.  Most schools are likely to be open and often are a good place for children to regain a sense of normalcy.  Being with their friends and teachers can help.  Schools should also have a plan for making counseling available to children and adults who need it.

Denise December 17, 2012 at 02:12 PM
In addition to keeping our children safe from outsiders, I feel it's equally important to keep our children safe from those students, on the inside, we feel are unsafe. My children attend the Reeves with a 4th grade student that has exhibited violent acts, for his age, since kindergarten. Last year, after many attacks on my son, I practically had to beg the principal & superintendent, @ a minimum, to remove my son from any class/recess this student was in. It was a battle tho no one argued this child was violent. In the end, I got "what I wanted", but I still feared (and still do) for the safety of the other children. When I asked the principal what does it take before a child like this get removed from school...bringing a gun to school? The horrifying answer was, "yes". More horrifying was the Asst Supertindent was sitting at the table in this meeting and said nothing. When I went over to meet with the Superintendent he backed up the principal. Imagine how powerless my husband and I felt?? It was a scary time in our lives knowing we entrust these individuals to protect our children daily. I should never had to beg or yell in order to protect my child, but that's what got me the best they would give me imagine? I hope Newtowne is an eye opener...
Denise December 17, 2012 at 02:15 PM
So again, I hope the school takes another look into their existing safety guidelines for those who are already IN the school system....who may have mental issues (or at least issues that raise serious concerns) that need addressing now before another act like this happens in our system. That child is already in the school, so all the security in place to get the bad guys out, doesn't help in this circumstance
Chris December 18, 2012 at 12:22 AM
The school systems play a big role in keeping explosive children untreated. Many parents have advocated for their children only to be denied appropriate special education services. In fact, Ms. Lanza battled the Newtown school system for services and did not win. School systems, in general, often deny services, because it's all about money, bottom line. It's time that this stops. Mental illness is very treatable. Also, it is a fact, that children or adults with mental health issues are 4 x more likely to be a victim of violence than the rest of the population and most people with mental illness never become violent. Furthermore, we as a nation, cannot continue to allow children easy access to guns.

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